Book List: Best New Thrillers and Mysteries

Book List: Best New Thrillers and Mysteries

As written in September 2022, anyways. I was recently shopping for books for my fabulous boss’ birthday, and we both tend to read these thrillers and mysteries – so it struck me to put together a book list! I got her many of the ones on here and I highly recommend them!

Without further ado:

The Paris Apartment by Lucy Foley

This was like an unexpected new favorite for me. My friend from the library kept telling me to read it and I should’ve prioritized it…I loved this one. Even in spite of the weird Jess/Nick Miller name stealing from New Girl (yes, Foley I caught that! How did an editor not?!). There was tons of twists and turns in this one, though I must admit it wasn’t entirely unpredictable. I would’ve loved a great big twist, but instead it was peppered with them at the end of each chapter. I did a lot of gasps while reading! Get a copy here.

The House Across the Lake by Riley Sager

This one started so slow, and then the second half hit and I got whiplash from the craziness! That’s a Riley Sager staple, I think… everything seems normal until it really, really isn’t. I loved the setting of this one, though; the rural Vermont backdrop, and specifically the fact that most of the book unfolds on a single lake of six homes, is kind of wild. It keeps your suspect list short, so things have to get really crazy to make some sense. Pick up a copy here!

Finlay Donovan Knocks ‘Em Dead by Elle Cosimano

The second installment of Finlay Donovan still hit that perfect mark. While these mysteries absolutely rock, the humor is also top notch and part of the reason I love it so much. The sequel is just as good as the original, and the plot totally thickens here. I think these books would make a great television series – they really remind me of Only Murders in the Building. It’s a good mystery, with good laughs too, in the form of Finlay and Vero’s antics. Check out my review of book one here and get a copy of your very own from Gibson’s here.

The Pallbearers Club by Paul Tremblay

The Pallbearers Club is a weird one, and I don’t even know if it should qualify for this “thrillers and mysteries” list. It really isn’t either, but the sense of suspense it creates definitely qualifies it for something. And I suppose, if you don’t really know what’s happening the whole time, it kind of is a mystery? I’m really not selling it right now, but I did actually like The Pallbearers Club. It was what I imagined Paul Tremblay would write well when I read Survivor Song and didn’t love it earlier this year. It’s weird, but it’s good weird. Get your very own here.

The Woman in the Library by Sulari Gentill

Last but certainly not least, The Woman in the Library! I got this gem as a galley earlier this year, and wasn’t even 100% sure I wanted to read it at the time…but I’m so glad I did. What a cool book inside a book inside a book. It has a good and creepy twist I think any fans of the mystery genre will enjoy. The creativity was just off the charts on this one, and I really enjoyed it. See my full review of the book here and get your own copy from good ‘ol Gibson’s here.

These are some “can’t miss”es from this year! With even more to come…I’ve got tons of galleys vying for my attention right now. It was a good summer for some thrillers!

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

The 52 Book Club 2022 Challenge Prompt: 22. An unlikely detective

I actually can’t come up with any other possible prompts for this one…this book has won awards, but it’s not from my country (but maybe it’s from yours?). It wasn’t part of my original plan to complete this one so I had a tough time fitting it in. That being said, let’s jump in!

After his neighbor’s dog is killed in the middle of the night, fifteen-year-old Christopher Boone sets out to figure out who killed Wellington the poodle. As he endeavours to solve the mystery and write this book, he ends up unraveling unexpected lies that affect him and his family, completely by mistake. Christopher, in trying to find Wellington’s murderer, ends up discovering all that he is truly capable of.

I know this synopsis sounds pretty cryptic, but honestly, you’re not going to get much more by reading the back of the book! The Curious Incident is written from Christopher’s perspective, and while it’s never explicitly stated, it becomes known to the reader that Christopher lies somewhere on the autism spectrum. He’s an absolute genius who can solve complicated math problems in his head, but he also can’t look people in the face when he talks to them and firmly believes that four yellow cars in a row means he’s going to have a bad day. So when things start going south for Christopher, he doesn’t notice or interpret it the same way that the other characters, or you or I might. The things that take precedence in his head are not the same things in yours, which makes this book not only enlightening but a very interesting perspective to read this family drama from.

I’m far from the first to read and enjoy Haddon’s novel – this book has been a well-loved book club pick for almost twenty years. I’m just finally getting around to it now…being, you know, in my early 20s. And I get why: I think for many people who don’t have friends and family on the autism spectrum, this can be eye opening. I don’t think the majority of the general public understands all the intricacies of it all, and so this book, presented as a narrative rather than a list of facts, can give them a lens through which to view this experience. And it’s beautifully done, 100%. I think the only reason this book didn’t blow me out of the water was that I had this prior experience and knowledge to read it with. I grew up around a family of teachers and special education teachers. I have family on the autism spectrum. Friends, too. Once you start to “get it”, you pick up on it in different situations, and the behaviors and thought processes are less shocking to you than it was to say, the strangers in this book. Instead, you just laugh or nod your head and move on.

Even without that incredible revelation to accompany my reading experience, this is a very good book. The perspective adds that depth, but the story that Haddon unravels is a wonderful coming of age tale and yes, a good mystery. About halfway through he really had me because I was gasping as I read along. “Nooooo, he didn’t!!” ~Me at like 5pm Wednesday night. I have to hand it to him, the yarn isn’t lacking here, and the imperfect resolution to this tale is raw and honest.

While this is a short novel, I certainly think the content is worth the read. I’ll definitely be recommending it to my teacher friends if they haven’t already read it. I laughed, I commiserated, and I even teared up a bit. This is a good one.

Have an awesome week, friends.